Category Archives: Sensor

The Dermal Abyss: Interfacing with the Skin by Tattooing Biosensors

Journal: ISWC

Author: Katia Vega, Nan Jiang and Xin Liu et al.

Affiliation: MIT Media Lab, Harvard Medical School

Publication date: 2017.09.11

Summarized by Jinpyeo Jeung

 

– Health monitoring tattoos (Fig. 1)
v. Glucose, pH and Sodium sensor.
v. principle: Using biosensor ink for tattoos.

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<Fig. 1>

 

– Biosensors (Fig.2)
v. Sodium biosensor: diaza-15-crown-5. Selectively bind to Na+ ions.
v. pH biosensor: anthocyanin.(Fig. 3)
v. Glucose biosensor: extracted from reagent strips.

fig2.png

<Fig. 2>

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<Fig. 3>

 

– Result
v. Glucose biosensor without glucose and with glucose (Fig. 4)
v. pH biosensor at pH 8.0 and pH 7.0 (Fig. 5)
v. Sodium biosensor with 100mmol/L Na+ ions under visible light and UV light (Fig. 6)
v. designs made by a tattoo artist in ex vivo pig skin.(Fig.7)

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<Fig. 4>

fig5.png

<Fig. 5>

fig6.png

<Fig. 6>

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<Fig. 7>

 

– Application by monitoring health status
v. Diabetes.
v. Dehydration.
v. pH Balance.

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Wearable Ring-Based Sensing Platform for Detecting Chemical Threats

Journal: ACS SENSORS

Author: J. R. Sempionatto and Joseph Wang et al.

Affiliation: University of California, United States

Publication date: 2017.10.11

Summarized by Inyeol Yun

 

– Ring-based Chemical Sensor (Fig. 1)
v. Explosives (DNT, H2O2) and nerve agent (MPOx) sensor
v. Printing fabrication (Fig. 2)
v. Sensing principle: redox reaction between working electrode and chemical (Fig. 3)

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Fig. 1

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Fig. 2

fig3.png

Fig. 3

 

– Materials
v. Working electrode: carbon ink (1), carbon-Prussian blue ink (2)
v. Reference, counter electrode: Ag/AgCl ink
v. All inks were purchased

 

– Result
v. Liquid-phase threat detection at the ring-based electrochemical system (Fig. 4)
v. Vapor-phase threat detection at the ring-based electrochemical system (Fig. 5)
v. Selectivity test (Fig. 6)

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Fig. 4

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Fig. 5

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Fig. 6

Self-assembled three dimensional network designs for soft electronics

Journal: Nature communications

Author: Kyung-In Jang and John A. Rogers et al.

Affiliation: Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Northwestern University

Publication date: 2017.06.21

Summarized by Jinpyeo Jeung

 

– 3D helical coil (Fig.1)
v. 2D structures limit performance for systems that require low modulus, elastic mechanics in compact designs.
v. 2D precursors spontaneously transform into desired 3D shapes.
v. Compressive forces induced by releasing the prestrain cause the 2D precursor to geometrically transform.
v. Two ends include small discs that form strong covalent siloxane bonds to and substrate.

fig1.png

Fig. 1

 

– Result
v. Enables high levels of strechability and mechanical robustness, without the propensity for localized crack formation or fracture.
v. The elastic stretchability of the 3D helices significantly exceeds that of the 2D serpentines. (Fig.2)
v. Deformations of the 2D serpentine lead to sharp, unavoidable stress concentrations at the arc regions but 3D helices shows uniform stress. (Fig.3)

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Fig. 2

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Fig. 3

 

– Application
v. Actual appearance. (Fig. 4, Fig. 5)
v. It can be applied to various wireless, skin-compatible electronics. (Fig. 6)

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Fig. 4

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Fig. 5

fig6.png

Fig. 6

Graphene Electronic Tattoo Sensor

Journal: ACSNANO

Publication date: 2017.07.18

Summarized by Inyeol Yun

 

– Graphene electronic tattoo (Fig. 1)
v. serpentine design
v. cost- and time-effective fabrication
v. thickness : 463 ± 30 nm  laminated by Van der Waals forces
v. optical transparency : ~85%
v. stretchability : >40%
v. ECG, EMG, EEG, skin hydration and skin temperature sensing

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Fig. 1

– Fabrication (Fig. 2)
v. Graphene : CVD Growth
v. PMMA-assisted transfer

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Fig. 2

– Device characteristics
v. Thickness, Transparency, Stretchability (Fig. 3)

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Fig. 3

– Result

v. ECG, EMG, EEG (Fig. 4)

 v. Skin hydration (skin impedance) and skin temperature sensing (Fig. 5)

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Fig. 4

fig5

Fig. 5

 

Batch Fabrication of Customizable Silicone-Textile Composite Capacitive Strain Sensor for Human Motion Tracking

Journal: Advanced Materials Technology

Publication date: 2017

Summarized by Inyeol Yun

 

– Highly stretchable textile-silicone capacitive sensor (Fig. 1)

v. Conductive knit fabric as electrode

v. Silicone elastomer(Ecoflex0030) as dielectric

v. Sensing principle (Fig. 2)

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Fig. 1

fig2

Fig. 2

 

– Fabrication

v. Supporting Information : admt201700136-sup-0002-S2.mp4 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/admt.201700136/full

 

– Result

v. Capacitance output of the fingers during hand motion (Fig. 3)

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Fig. 3